Posts tagged with “ralph fiennes”

Posted 1 year ago

fuckyeahdirectors:

Kathryn Bigelow and Ralph Fiennes on the set of Strange Days (1995)

Guiltiest of guilty pleasures: Strange Days in is my top 10 favourite films of all time.

Posted 1 year ago

Christmas movie of the day: The English Patient. And happy birthday Ralph Fiennes.

Posted 1 year ago

Happy last day on earth. Spoiler: no, it doesn’t end.

via moviesinframesStrange Days, 1995 (dir. Kathryn Bigelow) [this was my first submission to MIF!]

Posted 1 year ago

Guys in Ties #123 - Ralph Fiennes in Skyfall (2012)

Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago

newyorker:

From the Film Set of “Coriolanus”

This week Anthony Lane reviews Ralph Fiennes’s film adaption of Shakespeare’s “Coriolanus.” The photographer Kalpesh Lathigra took the production as an opportunity to shoot two different projects—although, he admitted, he hadn’t read the play. “Julius Caesar was my Shakespeare,” he told me. The first project, was a more conventional series of production stills. The second was a series of large-format photographs, shot with a 5x4 camera, “where the actors are not the prominent players on stage but merely part of the wider tableaux of the set,” Lathigra said.

- For more of Lathigra’s photographs from the set: http://nyr.kr/wjW7fK
Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago
In Bruges happened to me by accident one night on DVD. I didn’t catch it at the cinema because the poster made it look like some sort of crime caper – another questionable credit for Colin Farrell. In fact, a crime caper is what it almost is, but it’s also something more postmodern: a film noir gatecrashed by reality. What begins as a faintly chilling overlap of the underworld and the everyday becomes a glorious farce when normality refuses to go back in its box and let drama take over.

The result is like watching Pulp Fiction’s “Royale with cheese” exchange stretched over 90 minutes, only it’s braver than Tarantino because these hitmen never disappear into cool. They take out their contact lenses at night, queue up at tourist sites, drink too much local beer and tread on each other’s toes in the budget hotel room they’re forced to share. They fall over in the snow. It’s relentless, just like normality. The film’s only chase scene ends when the pursuer simply runs out of puff and has to stop to check his map (you know how these European canal towns are). Another character, grievously wounded, drags himself with his last strength to the top of Bruges’s medieval belfry to administer a lifesaving sniper shot, only to find – something that never happens at crucial moments in movies – the marketplace has been totally obscured by fog. Time and again, bathos derails pathos. McDonagh won’t let the film slide fully into either tragedy or comedy, but keeps it switching between, like a cockney villain trying to maintain his balance on icy cobbles.

Peter Beech My favourite film: In Bruges | Film | guardian.co.uk

In Bruges is in my top 10 films of the 2000s. Also, Ralph Fiennes as Harry: best villain for years - at least until Hans Landa walked into a house, somewhere in occupied France.

Posted 3 years ago

London Film Festival, Coriolanus press conference earlier this morning

Posted 3 years ago
Do say: It’s pronounced “Rafe”. As in “Salph as houses.”
Don’t say: I see his nose has got better.