Posts tagged with “buster keaton”

Posted 2 years ago

All hail Buster Posey

oldtimefamilybaseball:

Buster Posey is as good as advertised. I’m sorry, but that’s the truth. It’s not that he’s young, and hip, and plays in a super cool city and has blonde hair and a great tush (which he does), it’s that he’s really this crazy good. He’s a strong defensive catcher, and that .336/.408/.549 line this year, yeah, that may turn out to be career highs only because very few players, especially catchers, ever put up numbers like that twice. All Hail Buster Posey, second greatest Posey of all time (just behind Parker who, until Buster appears in a Christopher Guest film, will always remain number one.) 

(Read the rest here)

Also, all hail Buster Posey, second greatest Buster of all time. Until he stars in a remake of The General that is as good as Keaton’s.

Just FYI I was wearing my Posey shirt in bed last night. 

Posted 2 years ago

My Thoughts On…Steamboat Bill Jr.

neitherfamenorfortune:

Like Keaton I feel out of step sometimes with the world around me. Not quite fitting in to the way the world is. Never more so than when watching a silent film, live scored, introduced by Jim Broadbent and being overcome with joy and escapism that I rarely get from modern cinema. Maybe I have to reclaim my mode of viewing, create opportunities and environments for sheer immersion. Maybe I don’t.

All I know is that I have never seen this full film, and last night experienced pure joy at the power and wonder of cinema, feeling blessed that Keaton existed, and exists forever on celluloid. This Romeo & Juliet tale is full of pathos, love, cheek and some of the most incredible physical action sequences ever.

Not just remarkable for 1928, but simply remarkable. No one has done anything like it since. Proof that CGI can never make up for the imagination of humanity, coupled with human application. Houses and buildings fall balletically, trees fly with a man attached, a man stands parallel to the ground in a hurricane. He slips, and bends in shapes computers would struggle to make look real.

We laugh, we gasp, we smile. We constantly smile.

A true work of genius.

I feel exactly the same, and I regret not having been at last night’s screening of Steamboat Bill. Jr at the BFI - it’s my favourite Buster Keaton film, even if it may not be his best (The General is objectively unsurpassable).

What Neil* describes here was my problem with Hugo: for all its efforts to show me the unadulterated joy of early cinema, it never ever came close to the genuine simplicity, emotion, and beauty of it. The things you always find in Buster’s work. 

*a PS for film buffs: you should follow Neil’s tumblr Neither Fame Nor Fortune. He’s a filmmaker, a PhD student, and a teacher. He knows his stuff.

Posted 2 years ago

stayforthecredits:

Thanks to Sarah for sending this to me!

As a follow-up to our three-way tribute to the silent kings of comedy, we’ve produced a video essay paying tribute to the great Buster Keaton. This video is based on “Fall,” a poem by Dana Stevensfilm critic for Slate. The poem originally appeared in the January 1999 issue of The Atlantic and is reprinted below. - Keyframe: The Fandor Blog.

“Fall”

By Dana Stevens

for Buster Keaton

Ever wester
ever faster
Buster, hasten
your disaster.

Film is falling,
time a twister,
sound unfurling
her nor’easter.

Scale the mast
and list to keening.
Buster, listen:
are you dreaming?

Are you falling?
Are you flying?
Buster, cinema
is dying.

Not a whisper.
Never laughter.
Buster, thank you
for disaster.

Posted 2 years ago

oldhollywood:

“It was on purpose that I started looking miserable, humiliated, hounded, and haunted, bedeviled, bewildered, and at my wit’s end. Some other comedians can get away with laughing at their own gags. Not me. The public just will not stand for it. And that is all right with me. All of my life I have been happiest when the folks watching me said to each other, ‘Look at the poor dope, wilya?’

Because of the way I looked on the stage and screen the public naturally assumed that I felt hopeless and unloved in my personal life. Nothing could be farther from the fact. As long back as I can remember I have considered myself a fabulously lucky man. From the beginning I was surrounded by interesting people who loved fun and knew how to create it. I’ve had few dull moments and not too many sad and defeated ones.”

-Buster Keaton, in his autobiography My Wonderful World of Slapstick (1960)

(via)

One of the best books about the film world ever.

Posted 2 years ago

mightyflynn:

Buster Keaton & Viola Dana, ca. 1925

(via Dr. Macro)

Posted 3 years ago
Posted 3 years ago
secondopiano:

«I’ll Wait.»
Buster Keaton in The Cameraman, 1928
(via The Big Parade)

secondopiano:

«I’ll Wait.»

Buster Keaton in The Cameraman, 1928

(via The Big Parade)

Posted 3 years ago
Posted 3 years ago
zootime-:

“Keaton was not only beautiful in a classic, stoic way—he had also to his credit—especially in the two-reel shorts—the body of an athlete, the flexibility of a tantric genius—the peerless ass of something painted. Keaton, in the silents, radiated sex. And it was to his credit—still is—that he does so seamlessly: his was a modest sexuality, whose understatement called attention to the thing it sought to hide. In this case, a perfect body coupled with a sensitive, downtrodden spirit, a somewhat quirkier version of the Everyman, whose hour-and-a-half long documentaries of public humiliation were the joy of millions back in the day—that is, the millions who weren’t just watching it for his ass” read the full article here

YES.

zootime-:

“Keaton was not only beautiful in a classic, stoic way—he had also to his credit—especially in the two-reel shorts—the body of an athlete, the flexibility of a tantric genius—the peerless ass of something painted. Keaton, in the silents, radiated sex. And it was to his credit—still is—that he does so seamlessly: his was a modest sexuality, whose understatement called attention to the thing it sought to hide. In this case, a perfect body coupled with a sensitive, downtrodden spirit, a somewhat quirkier version of the Everyman, whose hour-and-a-half long documentaries of public humiliation were the joy of millions back in the day—that is, the millions who weren’t just watching it for his ass” read the full article here

YES.

Posted 3 years ago